Father of Cannabinoid Medicine
January 18, 2019
Medical Cannabis for Thyroid Disease
January 25, 2019

A large misconception regarding the therapeutic value of the cannabis plant continually marches on. Cannabis is often grouped together with tobacco, hard drugs, and even alcohol, with the latest trend being to designate cannabis as “less harmful” than these other substances. However, the fact of the matter is cannabis isn’t harmful, and it can help improve the way people think, process and understand information, and even function physically. If you were to picture your brain as a hard drive that is continuously intaking new data in, cannabis and its cannabinoid are the organizing and formatting tools that the drive uses to erase bad data, rearrange and reconfigure important data, and maintain and optimize the drive. In other words, cannabis is what helps keep certain parts of the brain tidy and well-performing.

This is a bit of an oversimplified analogy, but it gets at the meat and potatoes of what cannabis is and is not, why it’s beneficial to human physiology, and ultimately why the economic and social engineers don’t want you to have it. Cannabis is much like a “counselor” for the brain, science has revealed, acting specifically on cannabinoid receptors inherent to both the cerebellum and basal ganglia, which govern coordination of movement, and in the limbic system’s hippocampus, which “gates” information during the consolidation of memory

As the “grease” of the brain, cannabis doesn’t alter dopamine production like alcohol, cigarettes and hard drugs do. Crucial to a proper understanding of how cannabis affects the human brain is recognizing the fact that the brain was made for cannabis. Cannabinoids assist in bridging the gap between brain neurons, known as synapses, acting in ways that help positively regulate brain chemistry. When used appropriately, cannabis can help individuals break bad habits or learn new things. One source refers to cannabinoids as the “grease” that keeps the brain in tip-top shape, enabling mental growth and positive change.

“If cannabis were unknown, and bioprospectors were suddenly to find it in some remote mountain crevice, its discovery would no doubt be hailed as a medical breakthrough,” reported The Economist back in 2006 about the amazing wonders of cannabis. “Scientists would praise its potential for treating everything from pain and cancer, and marvel at its rich pharmacopoeia — many of whose chemical mimic vital molecules in the human body.”

Unlike alcohol, tobacco, amphetamines, cocaine and heroin, cannabis doesn’t interfere with the body’s natural production of dopamine, a foundational characteristic of drugs that induce physical dependence and have the potential to be abused. Cannabis exhibits no reinforcing properties, and the brain does not appear to have any cannabinoid receptors in dopamine-producing neurons.

“Marijuana is distinguished from most other illicit drugs by the locations of its brain-receptor sites for two predominant reasons: (1) The lack of receptors in the medulla significantly reduces the possibility of accidental, or even deliberate, death from THC, and (2) the lack of receptors in the mesocorticolimbic pathway significantly reduces the risks of addiction and serious physical dependence,” wrote Jon Gettman in a 1995 review of cannabis and how it affects the human brain.

“As a therapeutic drug, these features are God’s greatest gifts. Visit King Harvest for more information!